Easy Photo Manipulation Sky

 

Photo manipulation is such a cool effect to add to photos that need a little more push! Much like double exposure, this effect can create stunning photos when used in moderation. I’ve made a blog post about  Double Exposure that explains manipulating photos. Here is a super easy beginner’s tutorial on manipulated skies.

 

Eric Knighton

 

First thing you need is an overcast, or blank sky. These photos are perfect for photo manipulation because they can easily have a different image posted over them. This photo is from my Eric Knighton Photoshoot blog. 

 

Second step is to find a sky you like for your image. I chose a photo with a straight horizon so I could easily add it up with the horizon in my photo. This is the photo I picked via Google. I was really into the purple and pink hues this photo gives off.

 

3d-abstract_widewallpaper_beautiful-sky_57459

 

Next, you need to crop the photo at the horizon. Drag the sky over your image and line it up with your photo. Switch the blend to your liking – I picked “Darken” and lowered my opacity to about 75%. I added a Gaussian Blur to the photo from the filter menu in Photoshop to blur the sky.

 

Now you have to erase. This is the hardest and most tedious part of the whole process. You will most likely have a harsh line from where you pasted the sky on. All you have to do to remove it is erase it. Lower your opacity on the edges and corners to make erasing easier (without erasing too much) It is that simple!

 

Froot Loops

 

What do you guys think? Do you like photo manipulation? Let me know down below and give this blog a like if it was helpful for you!

Double Exposure Demo

Double Exposure is a super easy technique to master. I tend to not edit my photos this way because it can get to the point where it is too cheesy and redundant, and it can look incredibly lazy- just like black and white photos. These photos can be absolutely stunning when edited/taken correctly. This has been requested for some time, and to celebrate 4K+ followers on my Instagram, here it is! 

There are two ways you can create double exposure. You can either create these photos with the double exposure camera mode (If you’re camera has this mode), or you can use Photoshop to merge two photos together – this is what I have to do because my Nikon does not have the double exposure mode. 

 

Killer's Live

 

For this photo, I took two different pictures (using the same camera settings on both photos) and edited them the same as well in Lightroom. In Photoshop, I layered the photos on top of each other by dragging the photo I wanted on top to the other photo, lowered the opacity of the photo I dragged, and adjusted the photo to exactly where I wanted it. For this photo, I pressed Ctrl-T to resize the image, put it where I wanted it and BAM! You can layer more photos if you want a bigger affect, or you can add bokeh (which I will explain in another post)

 

DSC_0063

 

I just showed you how I edit my double exposure with two different pictures. This photo is the same concept, but instead of using two different photos, it is the same photo. I love to use double exposure on boring photos to give them some movement and life.

 

I recommend only using double exposure on your photos that need an extra push. It is very easy to get carried away with double exposure – when used at the right time, it can make for some great pictures.

Family Photos ♥

 

Here are some photos from the family photoshoot I did for my sister this weekend. Keenan is now 7 months old and needed some professional pictures because the maternity ones are now outdated. (lol)

 

My Favorite Photos I’ve Taken

 

Here is a mini collection of some of my favorite shots I’ve taken. I use my Instagram (@kmp.photog) as my portfolio so you can find all my shots, along with these, on there. Let me know any other blog posts you’d like to see!

 

What to Include In Your Wedding Contract ♥

 Having a wedding contract is VERY important. I’ve talked about contracts before in previous blogs, but on this blog, I’m going to go in depth and use my wedding contract as an example.

 A link to my personal wedding contract can be found here.  You obviously don’t have to copy this word for word or in this particular order. This is simply a guide to help you have all the rules of your service laid out for your clients. 

 A contact section is essential. This is the very first thing I include on both my wedding contract, as well as my photoshoot contract (I have separate contracts for both). I ask for the both of the client’s name, their current address and the address they will be at after the wedding, cell phone number, and email. Other things included in this section are all the details of the wedding, where the Ceremony and Reception will be located, along with the phone number/email for the locations (if applicable). I also ask for an additional contact who can be reached on the day of the wedding if the Bride of Groom are unavailable. (Can be a Bridesmaid/Best Man, or the parents of the Bride and Groom.)

At the last section on the front page, I have a section where the cost of the shoot is labeled in bold, and requires an initial at the top of the next page. This section also shows the deposit price to hold the spot for the wedding.

The next section is completely optional. I include a questionnaire so I can get an understanding of the client’s expectations of the shoot, and what they want the photos to look like.I have add-on packages included that they can add which come with props for the photos (a photobooth). Any specific questions can be asked in this section (What would you like me to wear? Would you like to take photos before or after the ceremony? etc). You can view the questions I ask in the contract.

The next three pages are very importan. This is where I keep all my rules and guidelines – my copyright laws, model release, limit of liability, and all my safety guidelines. Any expectations you expect for the client NEED to go in here, and as you have more photoshoots under your belt, keep your contract updated with new things you think of. I’ll post the link again here so you can see my contract and all the information.

The first page, questionnaire, and the last page are kept by me (the photographer). Anything with a signature needs to be kept by you. The client keeps the rules/guidelines pages. If the client would like a full copy of the pages I keep, I will of course provide it to them. But make sure you keep a copy of the signatures.

 

My photoshoot contract and wedding contracts are different. I posted my photography contract in a separate blog post – you can find it right here. Let me know your thoughts and if there is anything else you include in your contracts down below!

Re-editing My Old Photos

I started my photography journey over a year ago. My first DSLR was the Nikon D3300, a very well known beginner’s Nikon camera, along with the Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G lens. I purchased a beginner’s kit from eBay that came with the DSLR camera, kit lens, a battery and charger, an SD card, and a (terrible quality) tripod.

Since then, I’ve upgraded all my gear and have seen my work improve immensely. I decided it would be a cool blog post to go back and re-edit a photo from my first shoot. 

 

Original Image:PhotoDec02,11327AM_preview.jpegRe-edited Image:PhotoDec02,11306AM_preview.jpeg

When I first started photography, I thought over-saturating the colors was the best look. I thought bright colors were more appealing, but since then, I’ve preferred a more toned down and sharp image. This is my current style of editing, which is always evolving. This was my first photoshoot with my brand new Nikon D3300.

As I’ve learned more about photography and gained more experience, my photography has improved tremendously. Going back to re-edit old photos is a great way to improve your photography! Let me know how your photography has improved down below!

What to Include in Your Photography Contract

Having a photography contract is VERY important. I’ve talked about photography contracts before in previous blogs, but on this blog, I’m going to go in depth and use my photoshoot contract as an example. 

A link to my personal photoshoot contract can be found here. You obviously don’t have to copy this word for word or in this particular order. This is simply a guide to help you have all the rules of your service laid out for your clients.

 

  • A contact section is essential. This is the very first thing I include on both my photoshoot contract, as well as my wedding contract (I have separate contracts for both). I ask for the client’s name, address, cell phone number, and email.

 

  • Underneath the contact section, I leave all the details of the shoot. Specify where the shoot is located, when, and if you choose to offer different packages, which package they have chosen. This is important to specify for liability issues.

 

  • As the last section on the front page, I have a section where the cost of the shoot is labeled in bold, and requires a signature underneath. This insures that the client is aware of the price of the shoot + any add-ons, and will pay upon completion. This also includes a section for a parent to sign if the client is under the age of 18.

 

  • The next section is completely optional. I include a questionnaire so I can get an understanding of the client’s expectations of the shoot, and what they want the photos to look like. If any props are wanted by a client, (such as chalkboards, balloons, smoke bombs, etc) they can request them in the questionnaire.

 

  • The next page is another very important one. This page is where I keep all my rules and guidelines. This is where I put my copyright laws, model release, limit of liability, and all my safety guidelines. Any expectations you expect for the client NEED to go in here, and as you have more photoshoots under your belt, keep your contract updated with new things you think of. I’ll put another link here so you can see my contract and all the information.

 

  • After this is the final page, where I basically summarize everything they have just read. This little list changes frequently as well. At the very bottom is another place for them to sign. I have them sign twice so they can acknowledge/sign for the rules after the payment section, as well as the rules and guidelines separately.

 

  • The first page, questionnaire, and the last page are kept by me (the photographer). Anything with a signature needs to be kept by you. The client keeps the rules/guidelines pages. If the client would like a full copy of the pages I keep, I will of course provide it to them. But make sure you keep a copy of the signatures.

 

My photoshoot contract and wedding contracts are different. I’ll do a separate blog post about my wedding contract. Let me know your thoughts and if there is anything else you include in your contracts down below!